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Homepage>BS Standards>13 ENVIRONMENT. HEALTH PROTECTION. SAFETY>13.040 Air quality>13.040.40 Stationary source emissions>BS ISO 10396:2007 Stationary source emissions. Sampling for the automated determination of gas emission concentrations for permanently-installed monitoring systems
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immediate downloadReleased: 2007-02-28
BS ISO 10396:2007 Stationary source emissions. Sampling for the automated determination of gas emission concentrations for permanently-installed monitoring systems

BS ISO 10396:2007

Stationary source emissions. Sampling for the automated determination of gas emission concentrations for permanently-installed monitoring systems

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Standard number:BS ISO 10396:2007
Pages:34
Released:2007-02-28
ISBN:978 0 580 50208 8
Status:Standard
DESCRIPTION

BS ISO 10396:2007


This standard BS ISO 10396:2007 Stationary source emissions. Sampling for the automated determination of gas emission concentrations for permanently-installed monitoring systems is classified in these ICS categories:
  • 13.040.40 Stationary source emissions

1.1 General

This International Standard specifies procedures and equipment that will permit, within certain limits, representative sampling for the automated determination of gas concentrations of effluent gas streams. The application is limited to the determination of oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), or the sum of NO and NO2 as nitrogen oxides.

1.2 Limitations

It is recognized that there are some combustion processes and situations that may limit the applicability of this International Standard. Where such conditions exist, caution and competent technical judgment are required, especially when dealing with any of the following:

  1. corrosive or highly reactive components such as ammonia, hydrogen chloride and sulfuric acid;

  2. high vacuum, high pressure or high temperature gas streams;

  3. wet flue gases;

  4. fluctuations in velocity, temperature or concentration due to uncontrollable variation in the process;

  5. gas stratification due to the non-mixing of gas streams;

  6. measurements made using environmental control devices;

  7. relatively low levels of gas concentrations.